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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> congressman, van hollen, thank you very much for your time. >> thank you. >> tom: as fiscal cliff negotiations continued in washington today, stocks on wall street were stuck in neutral. the dow rose 15 points, the nasdaq gained nine, and s&p added a fraction. still, the benchmark s&p 500 index has regained most of the ground it lost after the presidential election. that's as investors may sense an agreement to avert the fiscal cliff is coming soon. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: the tree is up on wall and broad, and so is the u.s. stock market. the holiday season typically is a good time for stocks. in fact, since 1950, december has been the best month of the year for the s&p 500 with the index gaining an average of 1.7%. this december is off to a good start, even though the fiscal cliff looms large over trading floors. most investors remain optimistic there will be a deal in washington before santa arrives. but floor broker teddy weisberg isn't sure where all the optimism is coming from. >> it's a real dilemma here because a lot of folks that i talk to, and customers and professionals a
, republican and democrats will handle this jobs report in their fiscal cliff negotiations? >> well, you know, you're right. some folks look at this and say the economy's strong enough. it should be able to digest big tax increases spending cuts. others look at it and say look we still have a very high unemployment rate, a long way to go to get back to full employment. the economy can't tolerate big tax increases and spending cuts. most political debates the reality is in between. we do need to address our fiscal problem so we do need to go through some spending cuts and we also need some tax revenue increases. but we have to phase it in over time, otherwise the economy will choke on that. we can't have too much restraint too quickly. so we have to phase this in, smooth it in to make it palpable for the economy. >> susie: until that happens, there is a lot of anxiety in the labor market. the big fear for many individuals and for investors is that companies are going to start laying off workers. we saw this week that cities have announced 11,000 job cuts, is this the beginning of a trend, mar
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. their hope is that those will end with a deal between congress and the president and that will make way for a steady improvement in the economy. those are the things that they will monitor to see when is the time that they can ease back. >> sreenivasan: greg ip from the "economist," thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> sreenivasan: wall street initially rallied on the fed's pronouncement, but the enthusiasm quickly flagged and stocks gave up the gains. in the end, the dow jones industrial average lost three points to close at 13,245. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3,013. indianapolis will be the first major american city to replace all city-owned cars with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. the program announced today calls for completing the switch by 2025. the city also plans to phase in fire trucks and other heavy vehicles that run on compressed natural gas. officials said they're asking auto makers to create plug-in hybrid police cars, which don't yet exist. retiring u.s. senator joe lieberman said goodbye to the sen
it is this program that is now caught up in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> right. and it's unique this time around. this particular end of the month is a clear-cuttoff time. we have-- . >> brown: in the past it was phased out. >> right. and as harry said in your piece pointed out this is really the worst time of the year for this to happen. so what we need to do now is not just say oh let's just extend them. i think everyone thinks something like that has to happen. and it needs to be for a period of time that will be humane for the millions of people unemployed. we still have a very high unemployment rate. i think it's time now to do some experiments. how do we combine the extensions with mandatory training to make sure that people are skilled up when they reenter the labor force and don't take this bad decision, in my view, of simply dropping out bdz why do you think we need to do those experiments now rather than just continue or extend. >> well, this is the time to do it. congress is focused on extension. let's focus them also on changing the program subtlyment i think maybe judy and i may agr
tax is just too complicated to tackle in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> if we get to a comprehensive reform of the tax system and we say, "okay, here is the income tax. this is what we are going to do. now, we need an estate tax to back it up," maybe you could change the estate tax in that setting. but just one off, i think that's hard to do. >> reporter: if congress doesn't act soon, the current $5 million estate tax exemption will fall to $1 million on january 1, though it is unlikely to stay there for long. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: the fiscal cliff was certainly one topic on the agenda of the federal reserve today as policymakers kicked off their two-day meeting. tomorrow, the world will be waiting to see whether the central bank will do more to prop up the u.s. economy. the big question is whether the fed will stick with its so- called "operation twist" bond- buying program, or will it announce something new? erika miller takes a closer look at what's expected. >> reporter: the fed may announce a new twist in its bond buying plans, but that does
attempts to link the fiscal cliff budget negotiations to future increases in the nation's debt ceiling. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game because we've got to... we've got to break that habit before it starts. >> reporter: the 2011 standoff between the president and republicans led the nation to the brink of national default. standard and poor's even lowered its rating on u.s. government bonds. now, the president has proposed he be given authority to raise the debt ceiling without congressional action. house republicans reject that idea. and they've called for raising revenue without rate hikes, plus major
the standoff over the fiscal cliff. kwame holman updates the state of the negotiations and we talk with tennessee republican senator bob corker. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's thi
: and house speaker boehner accuses president obama of wasting another week in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tom: that and more tonight on
this week in fiscal cliff negotiations. and late today mr. obama said the administration will recognize a coalition of syrian opposition groups. online, we look at a truly long- term reporting assignment. hari sreenivasan has more. >> sreenivasan: paul salopek is about to spend seven years tracing the ancient path of human migration around the globe. we talked about his route, the shoes he'll wear, and his emphasis on "slow journalism." and what's it like to have breast cancer in the poorest nation in the western hemisphere? that's next from our series with "pri's the world" on cancer in the developing world. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. ray? >> suarez: and that's the newshour for tonight. on wednesday, we'll look at the world in the year 2030. one intelligence report projects china will be on top economically, and the u.s. will be energy-independent. i'm ray suarez. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. and
. >> rose: if they go off the fiscal cliff they do not reach a negotiation, a compromise by december 31st, who does the whitehouse think will get the blame? >> well i think it's not just the whitehouse charlie. the whitehouse and republicans are ultimately going to be blamed for this and that's why you're starting to see some fissures amongst republican rank and file you had today 40 house republicans signing a letter and saying they think all options should be on the table, including tax cuts and entitlements. it doesn't seem to be moving. house speaker john baron. but what it could ultimately do is start to lay the ground work for providing him cover to be able to back of of off his insistence they're not going to raise rates on top earners. what that letter shows i think that republicans are acknowledging that the president does have the leverage in these negotiations. over the summer privately republicans their aides were saying they didn't think the president would let it get to that point. he's chaffed becauseat's what she's shown to do in previous budget negotiations the debt ceili
aimed at avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> ifill: then, we look at michigan's debate over right-to- work laws which would prevent labor unions from requiring membership.
in congress are negotiating issues around the fiscal cliff. we think it is really important that they get something done because, obviously, if tax rates go up on middle-class americans come next month, it will be bad for those middle-class americans, it is will be bad for our states, and we're concerned about both the fiscal side and the economic growth side. >> susie: so talk to us a little bit about what kind of deal you would like to see. what were you proposing to the president? >> let's put it this way, if money is just shifted from the federal government to the states, that's not really saving anything. and the president understands that. we think it is really important. recognizing if there are cuts in funds, there ought to be a corresponding reduction in some of the requirements that are put on the states. so we really, as much as anything else, wanted to make sure that our voices are heard and that as decisions are made, whether it is about taxes, whether it is about spending cuts, that they be done equitably and with our input. >> susie: your state is headquarters to many large
, after resuming negotiations with the speaker of the house on a fiscal cliff agreement. and egypt's islamist president deployed troops outside the presidential palace amid growing protests against a referendum on a new constitution. and online we kick off a week- long look at how the developing world is tackling cancer. hari sreenivasan is here again. >> sreenivasan: more people die from cancer in low- and middle- income countries than from tuberculosis, hiv/aids, and malaria combined, but the fight against the deadly class of diseases has just begun there. see the first in our five-part series on our health page. and today our social security sage, larry kotlikoff, offers advice for outliving your money. that's on the business desk. and in our science roundup, find the perfect gift for your budding chemists and biologists, including a toy made from an owl's lunch. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll look at the raging political turmoil in egypt. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woo
the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. gwen: behind the scenes -- tea party pressure, as the movements most prominent senator builds a new platform. >> a lot of my role in the senate has been stopping bad things and saying no to bad things, but we need to do more than that gwen: abroad, tensions in syria on the rise. can the u.s. intervene? should we? covering the week -- jackie calmes of "new york times," eamon javers of cnbc, amy walter of abc news, and james kitfield of "national journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are work
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)